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Timely Firms Have Higher Returns?

| | Posted in: Fundamental Valuation

Do long lags between end of firm quarterly and annual financial reporting periods and issuance of SEC-required financial reports (10-Q and 10-K) indicate internal firm inefficiencies and/or reluctance to disclose adverse performance? In their August 2019 paper entitled "Filing, Fast and Slow: Reporting Lag and Stock Returns", Karim Bannouh, Derek Geng and Bas Peeters study the impact of reporting lag (number of days between the end of reporting period and filing date of the corresponding report) on future stock returns. They focus on firms with market capitalizations greater than $750 million that have deadlines of 40 days after quarter end for quarterly reports and 60 days after year end for annual reports (accelerated filers). They each month:

  1. Sort stocks into fifths, or quintiles, based on reporting lag separately for the most recent 10-K and the most recent 10-Q filings.
  2. Reform a portfolio that is long (short) the equal-weighted quintile with the shortest (longest) lags.

They measure risk-adjusted portfolio performance via monthly gross 1-factor (market), 3-factor (plus size and book-to-market) and 4-factor (plus momentum) alphas. Using 10-K and 10-Q filings from the SEC and monthly characteristics and stock returns for a broad (but groomed) sample of U.S. accelerated filers (roughly 1,500 stocks), and a comparable sample of European stocks, during 2007 through 2018 period, they find that:

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