Strategic Allocation

Is there a best way to select and weight asset classes for long-term diversification benefits? These blog entries address this strategic allocation question.

Page 1 of 1812345678910...Last »

Simple Asset Class Leveraged ETF Momentum Strategy

Subscribers have asked whether substituting leveraged exchange-traded funds (ETF) in the “Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy” might enhance performance. To investigate, we execute the strategy with the following eight 2X leveraged ETFs, plus cash:

ProShares Ultra DJ-UBS Commodity (UCD)
ProShares Ultra MSCI Emerging Markets (EET)
ProShares Ultra MSCI EAFE (EFO)
ProShares Ultra Gold (UGL)
ProShares Ultra S&P500 (SSO)
ProShares Ultra Russell 2000 (UWM)
ProShares Ultra Real Estate (URE)
ProShares Ultra 20+ Year Treasury (UBT)
3-month Treasury bills (Cash)

We allocate all funds at the end of each month to the asset class leveraged ETF or cash with the highest total return over the past five months (5-1). Using monthly adjusted closing prices for the specified ETFs and the yield for Cash over the period January 2010 (the earliest month prices for all eight ETFs are available) through Apriol 2014 (only 64 months), we find that: Keep Reading

Simple Asset Class Value and Momentum Diversification with Mutual Funds

“SACEMS-SACEVS Mutual Diversification” finds that the “Simple Asset Class ETF Value Strategy” (SACEVS) and the “Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy” (SACEMS) are mutually diversifying. Do the longer samples available for the “Simple Asset Class Value Strategy Applied to Mutual Funds” and the “Simple Asset Class Momentum Strategy Applied to Mutual Funds” confirm this finding? To check, we relate quarterly returns for the Best Value selections from the former and momentum winner (Top 1) mutual fund selections from the latter and look at the performance of an equally weighted portfolio of these two strategies (50-50). Using quarterly gross returns for the two strategies from the second quarter of 1998 through the first quarter of 2015, we find that: Keep Reading

SACEVS Performance When Stocks Rise and Fall

How differently does the “Simple Asset Class ETF Value Strategy (SACEVS)” perform when stocks rise and when stocks fall? This strategy seeks to exploit relative valuation of the term risk premium, the credit (default) risk premium and the equity risk premium via exchange-traded funds (ETF). To investigate, because the sample period available for mutual funds is much longer than that available for ETFs, we use instead the risk premium estimation methods (10-year rolling history of inputs) and strategy performance measurement approach from “Simple Asset Class Value Strategy Applied to Mutual Funds”, Specifically, each quarter we reform a Best Value portfolio (picking the asset associated with the most undervalued of the three premiums, if any) and a Weighted portfolio (weighting assets associated with all undervalued premiums according to degree of undervaluation) from the following four assets:

The benchmark is a quarterly rebalanced portfolio of 60% stocks and 40% U.S. Treasuries (60-40 VWUSX-VFIIX). We say that stocks rise (fall) during a quarter when the return for VWUSX is positive (negative). Using quarterly risk premium calculation data during January 1970 through March 2015, and quarterly dividend-adjusted closing prices for the three asset class mutual funds during June 1980 through March 2015 (140 quarters), we find that:

Keep Reading

SACEVS Performance When Interest Rates Rise

A subscriber asked how the “Simple Asset Class ETF Value Strategy (SACEVS)” performs when interest rates rise. This strategy seeks to exploit relative valuation of the term risk premium, the credit (default) risk premium and the equity risk premium via exchange-traded funds (ETF). To investigate, because the sample period available for mutual funds is much longer than that available for ETFs, we use instead the risk premium estimation methods (10-year rolling history of inputs) and strategy performance measurement approach from “Simple Asset Class Value Strategy Applied to Mutual Funds”, Specifically, each quarter we reform a Best Value portfolio (picking the asset associated with the most undervalued of the three premiums, if any) and a Weighted portfolio (weighting assets associated with all undervalued premiums according to degree of undervaluation) from the following four assets:

The benchmark is a quarterly rebalanced portfolio of 60% stocks and 40% U.S. Treasuries (60-40 VWUSX-VFIIX). We use the above T-bill yield as the short-term interest rate (SR) and the 10-year Constant Maturity U.S. Treasury note (T-note) yield as the long-term interest rate (LR). We say that each rate rises or falls when the associated average quarterly yield increases or decreases from quarter to quarter. Using quarterly risk premium calculation data during January 1970 through March 2015, quarterly average SR and LR, and quarterly dividend-adjusted closing prices for the three asset class mutual funds during June 1980 through March 2015 (140 quarters), we find that:

Keep Reading

Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy Robustness/Sensitivity Tests

How sensitive is the performance of the “Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy” to selecting ranks other than winners and to choosing a momentum ranking interval other than five months? This strategy each month ranks the following eight asset class exchange-traded funds (ETF), plus cash, on past return and rotates to the strongest class:

PowerShares DB Commodity Index Tracking (DBC)
iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Index (EEM)
iShares MSCI EAFE Index (EFA)
SPDR Gold Shares (GLD)
iShares Russell 1000 Index (IWB)
iShares Russell 2000 Index (IWM)
SPDR Dow Jones REIT (RWR)
iShares Barclays 20+ Year Treasury Bond (TLT)
3-month Treasury bills (Cash)

Available data are so limited that sensitivity test results may mislead. With that reservation, we perform two robustness/sensitivity tests: (1) comparison of returns for all nine ranks of winner through loser based on a ranking interval of five months and a holding interval of one month (5-1); and, (2) comparison of winner returns for ranking intervals ranging from one to 12 months (1-1 through 12-1) and for a six-month lagged six-month ranking interval (12:7-1) per “Isolating the Decisive Momentum (Echo?)”, all with one-month holding intervals. Using monthly adjusted closing prices for the asset class proxies and the yield for Cash over the period July 2002 (or inception if not available then) through April 2014 (154 months), we find that: Keep Reading

Tactical U.S. Stock Market Allocations Based on Valuation Ratios

Do simple stock market valuation ratios work for tactical allocation? In his April 2015 paper entitled “Multiples, Forecasting, and Asset Allocation”, Javier Estrada investigates whether investors can outperform a 60-40 stocks-bonds benchmark portfolio via tactical strategies based on one of three simple stock market valuation ratios: (1) dividend-price ratio (D/P); (2) price-earnings ratio (P/E); or, (3) cyclically adjusted price-earnings ratio (CAPE, or P/E10). The valuation‐based strategies take aggressive (conservative) stances when stocks are cheap (expensive) via combinations of the following rules:

  • Designate stocks as cheap (expensive) when a valuation ratio is below (above) its inception-to-date mean by one standard deviation (1SD) or two standard deviations (2SD).
  • Use 60-40 stocks-bonds allocations when stocks are not cheap or expensive. When stocks are cheap (expensive), shift toward stocks (bonds) by 20% to 80-20 (40-60) or by 30% to 90-10 (30-70). 
  • Rebalance either annually or monthly.

For the benchmark portfolio and the valuation-based portfolios when in 60-40 stance, rebalancing occurs only when the stock allocation drifts below 55% or above 65%. To accrue at least 20 years of data for initial valuations, strategy performance measurements span 1920 through 2014 (95 years). Calculations lag dividends and earnings by three months to ensure real-time availability. Testing ignores trading frictions and tax implications. Using monthly S&P 500 Index total returns and the yield on 90-day U.S. Treasury bills (T-bills) during September 1899 through December 2014, he finds that: Keep Reading

Effects of Execution Delay on Simple Asset Class ETF Value Strategy

“Effects of Execution Delay on Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy” investigates how delaying signal execution affects strategy performance. How does execution delay affect the performance of the complementary Best Value version of the “Simple Asset Class ETF Value Strategy”? This latter strategy each quarter allocates all funds to the one of the following asset class exchange-traded funds (ETF) associated with the most undervalued risk premium (term, credit or equity), or to cash if none are undervalued:

3-month Treasury bills (Cash)
iShares 7-10 Year Treasury Bond (IEF)
iShares iBoxx $ Investment Grade Corporate Bond (LQD)
SPDR S&P 500 (SPY)

To investigate, we compare 23 variations of the strategy that all use end-of-quarter (EOQ) to determine the best value asset but shift execution from the contemporaneous EOQ to the next open or to closes over the next 21 trading days (about one month). For example, an EOQ+5 Close variation uses an EOQ cycle to determine winners but delays execution until the close five trading days after EOQ. Using daily dividend-adjusted opens and closes for the risk premium proxies and the yield for Cash from the end of September 2002 through the end of March 2015 (51 quarters), we find that:

Keep Reading

Effects of Execution Delay on Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy

“Optimal Monthly Cycle for Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy?” investigates whether using a monthly cycle other than end-of-month (EOM) to determine the winning asset improves performance of the “Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy”. This strategy each month allocates all funds to the one of the following eight asset class exchange-traded funds (ETF), or cash, with the highest total return over the past five months:

PowerShares DB Commodity Index Tracking (DBC)
iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Index (EEM)
iShares MSCI EAFE Index (EFA)
SPDR Gold Shares (GLD)
iShares Russell 1000 Index (IWB)
iShares Russell 2000 Index (IWM)
SPDR Dow Jones REIT (RWR)
iShares Barclays 20+ Year Treasury Bond (TLT)
3-month Treasury bills (Cash)

In response, a subscriber asked whether sticking with an EOM cycle for determining the winner, but delaying signal execution, affects strategy performance. To investigate, we compare 23 variations of the strategy that all use EOM to determine the winning asset but shift execution from the contemporaneous EOM to the next open or to closes over the next 21 trading days (about one month). For example, an EOM+5 Close variation uses an EOM cycle to determine winners but delays execution until the close five trading days after EOM. Using daily dividend-adjusted opens and closes for the asset class proxies and the yield for Cash from the end of July 2002 (or inception if not available then) through the end of March 2015 (153 months), we find that: Keep Reading

Optimal Monthly Cycle for Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy?

As explored for a 10-month simple moving average (SMA) in “Optimal Cycle for Monthly SMA Signals?”, subscribers have inquired whether there is a best time of the month for measuring momentum in the “Simple Asset Class ETF Momentum Strategy”. This strategy each month allocates all funds to the one of the following eight asset class exchange-traded funds (ETF), or cash, with the highest total return over the past five months:

PowerShares DB Commodity Index Tracking (DBC)
iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Index (EEM)
iShares MSCI EAFE Index (EFA)
SPDR Gold Shares (GLD)
iShares Russell 1000 Index (IWB)
iShares Russell 2000 Index (IWM)
SPDR Dow Jones REIT (RWR)
iShares Barclays 20+ Year Treasury Bond (TLT)
3-month Treasury bills (Cash)

To investigate, we compare 21 variations of the strategy based on shifting the monthly return calculation cycle relative to trading days from the end of the month (EOM). For example, an EOM+5 cycle ranks assets based on closing prices five trading days after EOM each month. Using daily dividend-adjusted closes for the asset class proxies and the yield for Cash from late July 2002 (or inception if not available then) through early April 2014 (about 153 months), we find that: Keep Reading

Timing of Asset Class Allocations by Multi-class Funds

Do multi-class mutual funds exhibit good asset class allocation timing? In their April 2015 paper entitled “Multi-Asset Class Mutual Funds: Can They Time the Market? Evidence from the US, UK and Canada”, Andrew Clare, Niall O’Sullivan, Meadhbh Sherman and Steve Thomas investigate whether mutual fund managers time allocations across asset classes skillfully. They focus on three asset classes: equities, government bonds and corporate bonds. They apply two alternative methodologies: (1) returns-based, relating each asset class beta for a fund to next-month return for that class; and, (2) holdings-based, relating changes in asset class weights within a fund to next-month class returns. Using monthly returns and holdings for 617 U.S., UK and Canadian multi-asset class mutual funds during 2000 through 2012, they find that:

Keep Reading

Page 1 of 1812345678910...Last »
Login
Current Momentum Winners

ETF Momentum Signal
for June 2015 (Final)

Winner ETF

Second Place ETF

Third Place ETF

Gross Compound Annual Growth Rates
(Since August 2006)
Top 1 ETF Top 2 ETFs
14.3% 14.6%
Top 3 ETFs SPY
14.4% 7.8%
Strategy Overview
Current Value Allocations

ETF Value Signal
for 2nd Quarter 2015 (Final)

Cash

IEF

LQD

SPY

The asset with the highest allocation is the holding of the Best Value strategy.
Gross Compound Annual Growth Rates
(Since September 2002)
Best Value Weighted 60-40
13.7% 9.6% 8.6%
Strategy Overview
Recent Research
Popular Posts
Popular Subscriber-Only Posts